K-12

School and educator programs use works of art in the Whitney’s collection and exhibitions to create a forum for ideas, debate, and exchange. Programs at the Museum and in the classroom offer students and teachers opportunities to explore American art while learning from artists and each other.

Ahora Se Ofrecen Visitas Guiadas En Español

Guided Visits are now offered in Spanish.

Inscríbete Ahora


School Programs

Guided Visits for K-12 students are thematic gallery tours that build upon classroom learning. 


Learn about our tour themes.

Submit Request

This program features a one-hour and ten-minute Guided Visit and a one-hour art-making workshop in the Hearst Artspace that explores materials and experiments with artistic processes.

Submit Request

We work with a small group of New York City schools to create long-term partnerships with the whole school community.


Get Updates About School and Educator Programs


K-12 Teachers
Book a Visit

Free for New York City public schools

Bring your students to explore the Whitney’s spring exhibitions. Guided Visits for K-12 students are thematic gallery tours that build upon classroom learning. 


Free Guided Student Visits for New York City Public and Charter Schools endowed by The Allen and Kelli Questrom Foundation.

Submit Request

  • Painting of man holding a pitch fork and a woman.

    Grant Wood (1891–1942), American Gothic, 1930. Oil on composition board, 30 3⁄4 x 25 3⁄4 in. (78 x 65.3 cm). Art Institute of Chicago; Friends of American Art Collection 1930.934. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph courtesy Art Institute of Chicago/Art Resource, NY

  • Grant Wood (1891–1942), Lilies of the Alley, Earthenware flowerpot and found objects, 12 x 6 x 10 1⁄2 in. (30.5 x 15.2 x 26.7 cm). Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Iowa; gift of Harriet Y. and John B. Turner II. 72.12.38. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph © 2017 Mark Tade

  • Chandelier Sculpture made from Corn Cobb

    Grant Wood (1891–1942), Corn Cob Chandelier for Iowa Corn Room, 1925. Copper, iron, and paint, 94 x 32 x 34 in. (238.8 x 81.3 x 86.4 cm). Cedar Rapids Museum of Art, Iowa; gift of John B. Turner II 81.17.3 © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph © 2017 Mark Tade

  • Hopper's iconic painting of empty street scene.

    Edward Hopper (1882–1967), Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 × 60 1/4 in. (89.4 × 153 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.426. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by the Whitney Museum of American Art. Digital image © Whitney Museum of American Art

  • Close up view of smokestacks

    Elsie Driggs (1895-1992), Pittsburgh, 1927. Oil on canvas, 34 1/4 × 40 1/4in. (87 × 102.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.177 © Estate of Elsie Driggs

  • Black and white photograph of protesters with black rectangles covering their signs.

    Annette Lemieux (b. 1957), Black Mass, 1991. Latex, acrylic, and oil on canvas, 95 13/16 × 105 × 1 13/16 in. (243.4 × 266.7 × 4.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; promised gift of Emily Fisher Landau P.2010.173. © Annette Lemieux

  • Handwritten text that says "Relocate Destroy" in black and red.

    Edgar Heap of Birds (b. 1954), Relocate Destroy, In Memory of Native Americans, In Memory of Jews, 1987from the series American Policy. Pastel on paper, 22 × 29 13/16 in. (55.9 × 75.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Dorothee Peiper-Riegraf and Hinrich Peiper 2007.91

  • A room filled with golden pictures with text.

    Daniel Joseph Martinez (b. 1957), Divine Violence, 2007. Automotive paint on wooden panels, 153 × 275 × 187 in. (388.6 × 698.5 × 475 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Painting and Sculpture Committee, with additional funds from Neil Bluhm, Melva Bucksbaum, Philip Geier, Jr., Nicki Harris, Allison Kanders and Pamela Sanders  2008.289a-d

  • Installation view of An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017

    Installation view of An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, August 18, 2017–). From left to right: Suzanne Lacy, Learn Where the Meat Comes From, 1976; Guerrilla Girls, Guerrilla Girls Review the Whitney, 1987; Felix Gonzalez-Torres, “Untitled”, 1989; AA Bronson, Felix Partz, June 5, 1994, 1994/1999. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

  • Photograph of Niagara Falls.

    Zoe Leonard, Niagara Falls no.4, 1986/1991, Gelatin silver print, 37 ¾ x 25 5/8 in. (95.9 x 65.1 cm). Courtesy of the artist.

  • MLK sign.

    Zoe Leonard (b. 1961), Martin Luther King, Jr., 1999. Dye transfer print, 20 × 16 in. (50.8 × 40.6 cm). Collection of the artist; courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, and Hauser & Wirth, New York

  • Stack of suitcases.

    Installation view of Zoe Leonard (b. 1961), Robert, 2001. Ten suitcases, 72 7/8 × 21 1/2 × 20 in. (185 × 54.6 × 50.8 cm), Foundation MUSEION, Museum of modern and contemporary art, Bolzano, Galleria Raffaella Cortese, Milan, and Collection Enea Righi, Bologna


Guided Visits are now offered in Spanish.

Inscríbete Ahora

The Whitney is committed to being an integral part of our vibrant downtown community. In order to work more closely and deeply with K-12 schools in the area, we have started a new initiative called Neighborhood Friends. This initiative is open to all schools in District 2 and in Manhattan south of 23rd street.

Apply Now


Educator Programs

Teachers can explore materials, activities, and resources developed especially for K–12 audiences. 

Explore for Teachers

In this year-long professional development program, New York City teachers and Whitney educators learn from one another and exchange ideas about art and teaching.

Read more

Check out our Teacher Guides, designed for educators to use as a resource in the classroom before and after a visit to the Whitney. 


Download Our Social Narratives!

Prepare for your visit with our social narrative, which contains photographs and descriptions of what to expect on a Guided Visit or Guided Visit + Studio at the Whitney. Please note: this seventy-minute Guided Visit + Studio program is only for Access groups. 


Connect to the Common Core

Our programs have long supported classroom learning in the ways encouraged by the Common Core State Standards. 

Read more about the Common Core


Thank You!

Annual support for School and Educator Programs in the Laurie M. Tisch Education Center is provided by the Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation; The Pierre & Tana Matisse Foundation; Con Edison; and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Major endowment support is provided by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and the Annenberg Foundation.

Free Guided Student Visits for New York City Public and Charter Schools endowed by The Allen and Kelli Questrom Foundation.

Learn more